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20120928
20121006
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MSNBC 18
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English 18
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)
it was you didn't build that comment, the guns and religion comment, criticizing the cambridge police, he's done this a number of times. doesn't that have the same effect or resonance on his character? >> s.e., what i would say from a political angle and from where the media says this is a story, romney's remark wasn't just in temperate. it reflected a very hard, right political philosophy and a philosophy hostile in the fundamental way to the social safety net in this country. to the concept. >> steve, the president's comments reflected a far left position as well when it comes to you didn't build that or people cling to guns and religion. that's a political comment and statement as well. >> we're not litigating the comments here. we're talking about the fact it's remarkable when he first came out to address it, he basically backed up the comments and reiterated the essence of what he was saying. tried to clean it up a bit, but reiterated the essence. now he says he has it completely wrong. i don't want to let this block end. >> that's beautiful. one, just to address what you say, s.e. a
is two different things. >> where do you get a crazy religion like that? i've never heard of that religion. >> it's how you answer the question. >> that makes a lot of sense. i don't get shot. the other guy does but that's my religion. let's go back to you. what do you think is going to be the biggest fight? >> the biggest fight? boy, good question. i dobt know that there's going to be a fight. >> what are you going to actually do with all of these taxes? >> well, here's the thing about tonight. michael and i were talking about this tonight. we don't know -- either of these guys could screw up tonight. and so we don't know that they are going to be -- there is going to be this correct debate and everybody is going to do what they ought to do. >> do you think they will stay careful? >> i think they are conscious and weary at first but either mitt romney or barack obama, just because of the people they are, either one is capable of giving that wrong body language, that wrong -- >> okay. i'd be nervous if i were romney if we're 15 minutes in and it seems boring, i'd begin to
people clinging to funs and religion that people shorthand thinks in debates and in private. not contract the text of the actual words he used. that is right. there is no response that will not contradict the text of the actual words he used. that is right. there is no ability to actually get out of that box and i think his best attempt is what he put si rehis add. he cares for the middle class i do too. >> let's listen to what peggy noonan had to say about romney's possibilities. >> let's listen to what peggy noonan had to say about romney's possibilities. >>hie s a anceo no not likability and all that dumb stuff. he happens to be on stage with a guy who has been the president. wi trentead th bi, can't dismiss librariability. where would president obama be in the polls today? >> stewart, first of all, i talked not long ago to stewart stephens. where would president obama be in the polls today? >> stewart, first of all, i ta notong o totewa stephens. they want to make this an extended conversation. there are four debates. they may be hopihere civo n. so they care a whole lot about these d
clinging to funs and religion that people shorthand thinks in debates and in private. there is no response that will not contradict the text of the actual words he used. that is right. there is no abili t all ge ohat box and i think his best attempt is what he put up in his add. he says i square. he cares for the middle class i do too. >> let's listen to what peggy noonan had to say about mney's t he has a chance to no not likability and all that dumb stuff. he happens to be on stage with a guy who has been the priden with the president's lead with likability, you can't dismiss librariability. where would president obama be in the pol today? arstf l, i talked not long ago to stewart st stephens. they want to make this an extended conversation. there are four debates. they may be hoping there are undecided voters now. so they care a whole lot about these debates. i think what they have to do is not wor mut the likability factor. what she means by height and hest i don't know. the trees are the right size. but this is the one time where est. romney canfron he has to say to the president look
is not always pro-science. >> in a lot of ways, science like religion, has been co-oped by politics and is used to strans an agenda by both sides. how can we retain a faith in science when even science journalists can't be trusted anymore it seems? >> well, i think that sometimes -- you are right that sometimes science journalists can fall prey to hype and fall prey to political biases. the best way to avoid that is to have people more engaged in actual reading of like scientific journals or read more addition read the news arm of, for instance "nature." if people read more scientific journals and get the general gist of what a scientific article says, you can go right to the source and learn right from the source and read a wide variety of viewpoints in science. that's what we do at real clear science. we have as many viewpoints as possible. >> alex, i wouldn't make the claim that everyone on the left is pro-science and everyone on the right is anti-science. certainly you have written about this. people on the left have pushed the idea of a link between vaccines and autism, and i think that's
whether they were wealthy or poor, moe matter who they were, what their age, their race, their religion and they would be able to get safe abortions and where the women were treated with respect and humanity. and this is what the providers in mexico that they were working with, they were considered very humane abortions. they always had this reputation as being a very dangerous and bad place but actually the program that they set up was the opposite. so much of what we're seeing is very similar. but we don't have the good underground yet. >> do you see people who are concerned about the erosion of abortion rights and the way that access has been winnowed away? it doesn't even feel like win w winnowed away. sooms like it's bei seems like it's become hacked up. do you see people trying to pool resources in terms of where it right still is accessible in a legal and safe way and those becoming sort of hubs for the country and other women trying to women try to get to those places? >> there are abortion funds where people raise money to provide for low-income women who live in states where
, and the soviet union tried to crush all of the culture, the language, the religion, singing, dancing, anything that was lit wanian, but they couldn't crush basketball. during the darkest times during that 50-year occupation, lit wanians looked up to the athletes. they didn't have lithuania on their chest. they looked to them for inspirgs and it was a source of pride. many sent to siberia set up basketball kouts there. it let them do something they felt was lit wanian and gave them a will to live out there. >> this is a real deep story and meant a lot to you obviously. is it that is right you're part lit wanian or ultimate underdog story or something else in this for you? >> i remember -- >> it's his favorite thing. >> i can remember all the family holiday. my fathers and uncles played basketball in the town park. in the early '90s they wore the lithuan lithuanii lithuaniian tie-dye t-shirts. this summer i'm watching the olympics and the u.s. dream team bowl over everybody. i have the tv on a saturday morning and watching the u.s. play l play lithuania. it's still close. i'm cheering for these
he could humanize himself was to talk about his religion. that with a difficult with a conservative political base that was suspicious of mormonism. one of the main things of his record as governor was health care in massachusetts. >> he's talking about it now, he should have talked about it earlier. it's a big achievement. >> it was a risky strategy. >> let's put this in the context of the debates, chuck. were you surprised that christie has decided, do you think the romney campaign is pleased with him saying hey, first debate hits it out of the park thursday morning things are going to be totally different. >> thank you, chris christie for at least actually making the gaffe, the honest gaffe. the fact of the matter is that has to be what happens after the first debate. the narrative has to change. the polls have to move. romney has to clobber the president in the first debate. are they happy with it? i kind of think they needed the pep talk. i think the base needs a pep talk. they need to have confidence in their commercial. i think the idea that both sides playing this ridiculous
was to talk about his religion. that was very difficult during the course of the campaign with the conservative evangelical base suspicious of mormonism. the other thing is talk about his record of governor. one of his main things was health care reform in massachusetts. that also was very hard for him to do. >> he's talking about it now. he should have talked about it earlier. it's a big achievement to cover 98% of the people. >> let's put this in the context of the debates, chuck. are you surprised that christie decided and the romney campaign is saying, first debate, hits it out of the park, thursday morning things will be different? >> thank you, chris christie, for at least making the quote, the gaffe, the honest gaffe. the fact of the matter is, that has to be what happens after this first debate. the narrative has to change. the polls have to move. romney has to clobber the president in the first debate. >> if they don't move, it's over. >> in other words, are they happy with it? i kind of thing they needed the pep talk, ok? i think the base needs a pep talk. they n
religion research institute found a majority of advocates of abortion rights favor president obama. now, opponents of abortion rights, they go with romney, 74%. now, the two candidates are diametrically opposed. romney would end funding to planned parenthood, he'd be against mandatory contraception coverage, and said he'd overturn roe v. wade, but at one point he wanted the opposite. >> i believe that since roe v. wade has been the law for 20 years, that we should sustain and support it. >> i have supported the roe v. wade. i am pro-choice. my opponent is multiple choice. >> well, the president has consistently supported roe v. wade. he told a student town hall just that in 2004. >> it's not our position to impose on that woman something that has to do with her body. it's her body essentially that is at stake. >> the president has faced criticism. his plan to require religious employers to offer contraception came under fire, and before that in order to get the health care reform bill passed, he agreed to ban federal funds for abortion except in certain cases. now, to blunt the hangover
religion, more religious diversity on the court. there's all kinds of issues. >> pthere are six catholics and zero jews. >> four people at the top of the presidential, vice president presidential, one prod substantiate. mormon and catholic. >> really, genuinely, open to talent of all sorts. one thing, it again matters who the vacancy is. if it's ginsburg, there's probably more pressure to have a woman replace that than if brier steps down. >> if romney wins, and there's an unexpected vacancy from a justice appointed bay democrat, this would be -- that would be the titanic fight of all time. if the fifth vote to uphold roe is the vote that for some reason retires or leaves the court, right? and mitt romney is the president of the united states, that's the biggest fight ever in our lifetime. tell us what that's going to look like after this break. viou. haha. there's more than that though, there's a kick to it. there's a pop. wahlalalalallala! pepper, but not pepper, i'm getting like, pep-pepper. it's kind of like drinking a food that's a drink, or a drink that's a food, zip zip zip zip zip
and democrats are a bit depressed. >> i know he doesn't believe in his religion, any kind of intoxicants or obviously, or any kind of caffeine. he was the mormon equivalent of ca caffeinated on the. he was up and gung-how. he relished the occasion. obama was like, is this freaking thing over yet? >> i think he reported he ordered from the cheesecake factory. lots of sugar. so that might have been it. he did a lot of things well. i think the most important thing in terms of impacting with race is he revved up the base without a doubt. >> and even the tenth amendment stuff. >> you can go to any conservative in the country and they're saying, not just because he won but he hit a lot of their buttons and simultaneously in style and as you substance appealed to disinterested voters and he needs to rally the base but he needs -- >> governor romney was able to talk about examples of people he talked to over and over again. i met this guy here and this person there. i know it was -- i think it probably worked. >> you know what, chris? i sort of disagree with you. i think what we saw was one cand
't conservative enough and didn't put religion into the political marketplace enough. but i don't think that's going to be the widespread expectation of the american people. i think the tea party is seen as a force that energized the republican party initially. but is now really become an anchor around the party. mitt romney has really has not been allowed to advance more mainstream positions because the right and the religious right are holding him back and i think you can find a number of senate seats that the republicans would have captured in 2010. and in 2012. >> we're going to look at one in indiana a little bit later. >> quickly, ed, if it's not the conservative christian coalition that becomes the backlash group, if you will. what might that group look like in terms of demographics at least? >> i think eleanor touched on it at the beginning. if the president is able to win 70% of the hispanic vote or get close to that, republicans and some of them have been talking about it this cycle realize they have to find a way to appeal to the hispanic voters in this country. because if they do
religion and research institute at pew about the white working class voters. they're roughly split between the president and romney in everywhere but the south where there's a huge gap. the one region where white working class voters are supporting the president over mitt romney is in the midwest, is in your region. what is -- what's the source of that? is that the auto rescue? is it the out of touch plutocratic heir of mitt romney? >> it's yes and yes. higher rates of unionization among white working class voters. it's the auto rescue but it's the part of the auto rescue especially for nonworking voters that are rarely talked about in national media. you have insight that most don't have on this, chris, i think, and it's the supply chain. tier 2 and 3 and tier 4 supply chain auto companies. the uaw members that work at the jeep plant in toledo that put together the wrangler, the liberty, and the uaw workers in youngstown that put together the cruise that wouldn't be there in all likelihood without the auto rescue, they're already vote are for obama, voting for me, voting for democrats bec
, yeah. >> why is it? why is it so special? >> it discusses god from many aspects, religion from many aspects, morality, getting carried away with god is as offensive as denying god. >> i was going to ask you personally. you obviously have a problem with people proselytizing and getting in your face about god, but do you believe in god? >> i haven't made up my mind. >> you got time. >> yeah. i don't think so. >> you've got time, my man. >> yeah. >> in your absence from the stage, and you've been so successful in everything you've chosen to do, did you realize how much you may have missed the instant feedback from a live audience? >> well, i would like to say yes because this play means so much to me, but i've been touring for three years with a one man show of "fdr" and i know i don't look like him, i don't sound like him but, boy, i love to preach him. >> i bet. who are you politically? through time, because -- >> they would be too liberal for you. >> well who are they? >> you'd probably be surprised. >> not for me. >> i know. >> well, hell you could go with carl marx with her. >> oh
Search Results 0 to 17 of about 18 (some duplicates have been removed)